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sodomymcscurvylegs:

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Do you ever just look at someone and think
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elp89:

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One of the hottest women on planet earth


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I told my husband to play with our puppy more. He sent me this.

"i’m dashing" 


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Dale a Internet una Imagen




y ellos harán lo peor….

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23
tw-koreanhistory:

Saigu, April 29, is a landmark date for many of LA’s Korean-Americans

by Ruxandra Guidi, April 24, 2012
Ask most people to recall an image of the 1992 riots, and they will bring up the endless video loop of LAPD officers beating Rodney King or the smoke that lingered above the city for days.
They will also bring up the sound and images of gunfire from Korean shop owners as they defended their Koreatown stores from looters. To many in the Korean community, seeing that footage on TV over and over again was a humiliating experience. And to many young Korean-Americans, it was mostly confusing. Juri Kang was 9 when she first experienced the simmering conflict here in the early 1990s. Her parents’ store and gas station were both robbed in one night, a year before the eruption of the riots. As the thief fled, he fired at Juri.
Kang was rushed to the hospital, shot once in the chest. Soon after, news cameras were at her side.
“I remember asking my mom why I was on the news, and I remember she told me that it was because I was the youngest girl to get shot during a robbery when her parents were left unharmed,” Kang recalled. “And I just took it and accepted it until I entered puberty. We didn’t really talk much about it.”
Around the same time, there were several confrontations between Korean-Americans and blacks in South Central. Most notoriously, Korean grocer Soon Ja Du shot and killed a black girl, Latasha Harlins, for allegedly trying to steal a bottle of orange juice.
On April 29, 1992, the riots erupted. “That night, I was at a family friend’s house watching it on TV as it was happening,” said Kang. “I remember saying, ‘Oh, they didn’t burn my parents’ gas station!’ And, of course, it burned the next day.”

In the end, five Korean merchants were killed. More than 2,000 properties were damaged or destroyed across Los Angeles County, contributing to an estimated $1 billion in damage. Many of those who suffered the impacts believe that the city of Los Angeles never repaired relations with the Korean community after the riots. “In some respects, the Korean-American perspective on the riots is that Korean-American merchants had become sort of a scapegoat for the problems the city was experiencing in the early 1990s,” said David Kim, an attorney and documentary filmmaker.

Read more: http://www.scpr.org/news/2012/04/24/32140/saigu-or-4-29-remembered-korean-americans/


680
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